CLARB ASLA Summit: Why this is Important to Maine LA Licensure

 Summit participants were joined by Columbus City Councilwoman Jaiza Page and two city council staff members for a site tour of the award-winning Scioto River Greenways Project.

Summit participants were joined by Columbus City Councilwoman Jaiza Page and two city council staff members for a site tour of the award-winning Scioto River Greenways Project.

ASLA and the Council of Landscape Architectural Registration Boards (CLARB) co-hosted for the first time a joint Licensure Summit, in June in Columbus, Ohio.

The Summit focused on building effective relationships between ASLA chapters and state licensing boards to enhance licensure education and defense. Participants included nearly 90 individuals representing over 40 states and CLARB jurisdictions. Terry DeWan was invited to attend on behalf of CLARB as a previous member of the Board of Directors.

The event opened with a debrief on the 2018 state legislative session and its unprecedented efforts to reform occupational licensure – through deregulation, broad sweeping licensure board reviews, interstate compacts for temporary licensure, and Right to Earn a Living Act bills. The session included firsthand observations from boards and chapters that have worked together successfully to address these challenges.

There were many success stories from the participants regarding challenges to licensure. Here are a few ideas that MaineASLA should all be considering:

Review the Best Practices for State Licensure Board–ASLA Chapter Relationships. While not all practices will be applicable to Maine, there’s a wealth of experience that should be considered.

• Establish and cultivate relationships with legislators. Make sure they understand the scope and significance of our practice.  Invite them on tours. Send them copies of Landscape Architecture magazine.  Invite them to project openings. Become THE person to contact with questions on our profession.

• Lobbyists!  MSLA may want to consider retaining a lobbyist to be on standby. We heard from many speakers about how effective a partner they were in uncovering legislation, establishing relationships, understanding positions, and guiding action.

• If you haven’t seen it, get a copy of the Blue Book: Landscape Architecture Licensure Handbook, Ensuring Safe, Healthy, and Resilient Natural and Built Environments. It’s an outstanding resource available through ASLA.

• Remember to say Thank You to all who participate in any activity relative to licensure.

Anyone can visit ASLA’s Advocacy Tools Page for toolkits and many other additional resources to help carry out an effective chapter advocacy program. Also, be sure to search for #LicensureSummit on Twitter for a fun and informative recap of event!